Category: Date

X Marks the Spot Along the Ohio River

The story of the Ohio River has never been straight and clear. Like the waterway itself, the history of the river meanders and rolls, falls and loops about again. This is a river alive with the spirit of Native Americans; moving with the enterprise of frontier families, yet still learning to balance the demands of commerce with the fragility of nature.

R Rising Sun West

Be forewarned – there is a robbers’ lair tucked into the banks of the Ohio River. Named Cave-In-Rock by notorious pirate and murderer Samuel Mason, this once violent site is now a peaceful addition to the Illinois State Park system. Visitors often stay in  comfortable cabins while exploring the nearby iron furnace, or the Garden of the Gods.

Located in Clarksville, Indiana, the once impressive 26 foot drop in elevation along two and one half miles of the Ohio River is now an educational site where fossils more than 390 million years old are preserved. Due to the fluctuating water levels of the Ohio River, the Falls of the Ohio State Park is best visited in late summer and through early winter.

The public is invited to learn more about the Ohio River where it flows through Southeastern Indiana when independent filmmaker Dennis Neary presents his film, Take the River, at the Lawrenceburg Public Library on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at 6:00PM.

V is for Vehicles

From the Avanti to the Pilot, Indiana has enjoyed a colorful and eclectic love affair with vehicles.

 

In the early 1900s, only Michigan produced more vehicles than Indiana. Many of Indiana’s car manufacturers were smaller companies, like Richmond’s Westcott Motor Car Company, or the McFarlan Motor Corporation in Connersville, or the J & M Motorcar Company of Lawrenceburg.

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Certain Indiana car manufacturers’ names are immediately recognized by the general public even today:  Studebaker and Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg and Willys-Overland . These are iconic names and still incredible vehicles.

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The role of the automobile in Indiana’s history is too expansive a topic to fit into one post, so look for future stories highlighting many of the lesser known car manufacturers. Many of these enterprises began as carriage works or wagon makers in the small towns and quiet communities throughout the state.

 

M is for Making

Making, building, engineering … give a kid a couple of Lego building bricks and watch out … she or he might end up in a museum!

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If this exhibition comes to a venue near you, please make an effort to see it. Just the amount of time spent on each piece is astounding.

Beautiful and perfectly engineered.

Art – with a click rather than a twist!

 

The artist uses what is generally considered to be a toy to express some profound feelings and observations.

 

None of the pieces translates to photography very well – this is one of those things you must see in person.

Enjoy!

L is for Learning About IN200

As you might have learned in an earlier post, 2016 marks Indiana’s Bicentennial. A huge part of the year long celebration depends upon the public’s enjoyment, attendance, and participation in all that is planned for the weeks and months to come.

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The only trouble is that a lot of folks I meet in towns, on farms, and during meetings don’t quite know where to learn about all of the great goings on, but very much want to get involved, nonetheless.

The state’s website is helpful, but so abundantly full of information, it might be simpler to seek out your local tourism office, connect with the county historian, or stop by the library. If those folks don’t know the answers, they are generally pretty wonderful about finding someone who does.

So – here are just a few of the celebrations and programs, complete with highlighted text linked to the primary source, that residents and visitors alike can enjoy throughout the state of Indiana. I will add to the list as time allows, but have begun with just those events taking place in the more eastern counties of the state.

Oh! And if you, Dear Reader, would like to share your own ideas or suggestions, please feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you so much in advance!

 

Allen County-Fort Wayne Historical Society has paired digital convenience with real life experience through the 200@200 ongoing event. This innovative program offers a virtual tour of some of the museum’s collection of artifacts – a great way to prepare for an in-person visit.

For the gear-head in all of us, Kokomo is the place to be this autumn – from a classic car driving tour to an opportunity to see vintage automobiles that were actually built in Kokomo. So pile in the rumble seat, pull on the goggles and rev (or crank) those engines!

Noble County offers a wilderness experience to anyone adventurous enough to visit – with an entire herd of bison soon to be on display throughout the county! This is not only quirky – it is a great opportunity to learn about bison and why they are such an important part of Indiana’s history!

The place for chocolate, the home of one of the greatest toy stores ever, and now – the setting for a year long scavenger hunt – along with prizes! Wayne County offers music, amazing food, and is where I first learned about Lemonade Day!

If historic barns are a part of your heritage or simply something that you love to see when driving down the road, a stop in Wabash County is a must.  Fifty new paintings of heritage barns by artist Gwen Gutwein will be on display throughout the year.

That’s all for now – but I will certainly post more information about Indiana’s Bicentennial throughout the year.

Safe travels and stay in touch!

 

I is for Indiana’s Bicentennial

This year marks Indiana’s 200th birthday. This momentous occasion is being celebrated throughout the state in as many different ways as there are Hoosiers.

In between those special events and following the official proclamations, consider a drive to an unfamiliar county that will you will leave feeling  exhilarated — or take flight over the city you thought you knew.

There is a lot to learn in Indiana’s small towns’ local museums, and by listening to some of the best jazz ever recorded.

After so much exploration and discovery, it will be wonderful to simply laze the day away beside the Ohio River.

Find your passion and your bliss in the Midwest during this year-long celebration of Indiana.

If you were ever planning on visiting the Crossroads of America,

2016 would be the year!

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Discovering Home

 

For More Information:

http://www.visitindiana200.com/

http://www.200indianabarns.com/

http://www.indianahistory.org/train/what-is-the-indiana-bicentennial-train#.Vw5JBvkrI2w

http://www.in.gov/ibc/

 

H is for Homerun – Vintage Baseball

There is something about baseball – real baseball. Not the mega-million-dollar, made-for-TV broadcasts.

This is baseball at its finest, where the cranks (also known as fans) can breathe in the fresh grass  while experiencing that satisfying thud of a fly ball hitting a outfielder’s bare hand for the final out.

These gentlemen players are just that – gentlemen who play the game without swearing, without brawls, without dirty tricks. The visiting team will cheer on the home town guys. When any player makes an impossible catch seem effortless, both dugouts applaud – as do the spectators.

It is worth seeking out these games, and taking all generations. Grandparents might remember stories about locally famous players; younger children will see true sportsmanship in action, and everyone will have a wonderful afternoon together.

For more pictures of the

Belle River Baseball Club and the Batesville Lumbermen

playing vintage baseball,

please visit Creatzart.com

Thank You.

A is for Athens

Well, the flavors of Athens -as in Athens, Greece. And what flavors they are!

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When planning your next visit to Harrison, Ohio, be sure to include a ravenous stop at The Big Greek Cafe. It’s a perfect choice for families, couples and even business meetings.

Dimitri Evangelou is that personable guy behind the counter. He also happens to be the owner, who describes his menu as ‘Greek comfort food’. Certainly there can be no doubt about that! Fragrant, delicious, and satisfying – it’s like hanging out in your mother’s kitchen just in time for dinner.

Athens GREEK DE Slicing Gyro

As soon as you walk in the door, it’s obvious that you’ve come to a neighborhood place. Dimitri enjoys feeding people and has a knack for making them feel welcome. Whether picking up a carry-out lunch, or bringing family in for dinner, he knows many of his customers by name.

 

Athens GREEK Ordering Duo

 

 

For those folks new to the Big Greek Cafe, the menu is descriptive, but if that’s not enough information, the friendly people behind the counter are happy to answer questions about any entree, side dish or dessert.

 

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There’s always room for friends and family at The Big Greek Cafe – just come hungry!

 

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Good food made with love, heritage, and pride.

Sometimes it’s best just to admit it – no willpower can overpower the allure of that cake.

 

 

DH Athens GREEK Retail2And why not take a little bit of Athens home with you?

 

 

So come on in, have a seat, grab a fork, and close your eyes – your excursion to Athens is underway!