Category: Family

V is for Vehicles

From the Avanti to the Pilot, Indiana has enjoyed a colorful and eclectic love affair with vehicles.

 

In the early 1900s, only Michigan produced more vehicles than Indiana. Many of Indiana’s car manufacturers were smaller companies, like Richmond’s Westcott Motor Car Company, or the McFarlan Motor Corporation in Connersville, or the J & M Motorcar Company of Lawrenceburg.

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Certain Indiana car manufacturers’ names are immediately recognized by the general public even today:  Studebaker and Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg and Willys-Overland . These are iconic names and still incredible vehicles.

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The role of the automobile in Indiana’s history is too expansive a topic to fit into one post, so look for future stories highlighting many of the lesser known car manufacturers. Many of these enterprises began as carriage works or wagon makers in the small towns and quiet communities throughout the state.

 

U is for Unexpected

On the shelves and in the nooks of Granny’s Cookie Jars and Ice Cream Parlor, are tucked nearly as many salt and pepper shakers as there are cookie jars.

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This family owned shop is as delicious to look at, as the ice cream is to eat!

How about a little turkey or duck with that?

It’s like a scavenger hunt for fun!

Enjoy yourself for an afternoon in Metamora.

Q is for Quilting

Handed down from one generation to the next, quilting is sometimes considered to be an aging art or a forgotten DSC_0082laborious task.

In actuality, quilting is fresh and alive and bursting into the future. Time-saving mini-quilt kits are available, and today’s projects can be made in whole, or in part, on technologically advanced machines.

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Modern designs, superior fabrics, and wide open opportunities for self expression have completely erased any lingering stereotypical images of hand sewing by candlelight.

 

Seek out quilt shows, like the annual Quiltfest in Rising Sun, Indiana, where these quilts were photographed earlier this month. Talk with creative and informative quilters, like members of the Sunshine Stitchers or Rivertown Quilters.

Visit your local fabric shop – not one of those mega-craft-warehouses. A real fabric shop where the employees actually make things, and can tell with one touch or a glance if that bolt of fabric is 100% cotton, or a blend.

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Discover the incredible world of color, texture and adventure!

 

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For more pictures of Quiltfest 2016, please visit;

Creatzart.com

Thank you.

O is for Overlooked

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It happens to all of us – this overlooking, neglecting, ignoring. Life is too busy, time is too short.

But in the rush to accomplish and do and become, all too often we forget what made living so exciting and happy and fresh …

 

 

 

The overlooked might be funny …

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Might be lovely …

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Might be silly …

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Might be cool …

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Might be meaningful only to one person.

But still, very important.

L is for Learning About IN200

As you might have learned in an earlier post, 2016 marks Indiana’s Bicentennial. A huge part of the year long celebration depends upon the public’s enjoyment, attendance, and participation in all that is planned for the weeks and months to come.

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The only trouble is that a lot of folks I meet in towns, on farms, and during meetings don’t quite know where to learn about all of the great goings on, but very much want to get involved, nonetheless.

The state’s website is helpful, but so abundantly full of information, it might be simpler to seek out your local tourism office, connect with the county historian, or stop by the library. If those folks don’t know the answers, they are generally pretty wonderful about finding someone who does.

So – here are just a few of the celebrations and programs, complete with highlighted text linked to the primary source, that residents and visitors alike can enjoy throughout the state of Indiana. I will add to the list as time allows, but have begun with just those events taking place in the more eastern counties of the state.

Oh! And if you, Dear Reader, would like to share your own ideas or suggestions, please feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you so much in advance!

 

Allen County-Fort Wayne Historical Society has paired digital convenience with real life experience through the 200@200 ongoing event. This innovative program offers a virtual tour of some of the museum’s collection of artifacts – a great way to prepare for an in-person visit.

For the gear-head in all of us, Kokomo is the place to be this autumn – from a classic car driving tour to an opportunity to see vintage automobiles that were actually built in Kokomo. So pile in the rumble seat, pull on the goggles and rev (or crank) those engines!

Noble County offers a wilderness experience to anyone adventurous enough to visit – with an entire herd of bison soon to be on display throughout the county! This is not only quirky – it is a great opportunity to learn about bison and why they are such an important part of Indiana’s history!

The place for chocolate, the home of one of the greatest toy stores ever, and now – the setting for a year long scavenger hunt – along with prizes! Wayne County offers music, amazing food, and is where I first learned about Lemonade Day!

If historic barns are a part of your heritage or simply something that you love to see when driving down the road, a stop in Wabash County is a must.  Fifty new paintings of heritage barns by artist Gwen Gutwein will be on display throughout the year.

That’s all for now – but I will certainly post more information about Indiana’s Bicentennial throughout the year.

Safe travels and stay in touch!

 

K is for Knowledge

The world is always-growing, changing, updating. As a result, it can be more than a little challenging to keep up with technology, politics, Wall Street – and what’s on sale this week at the local grocery store.

Fortunately, there are such things as libraries. Whether a Carnegie classic or a neoclassical delight, these public buildings are free and available to everyone.

Inside every library are newspapers and atlases and escapism reading – but oh so much more!

Stop in on any given day, and you might find a passionate discussion on current affairs, a plastic brick building competition, a writers’ support group, a fairy garden class, a cookbook club, a local history presentation …

And the amount of information and guidance tucked wKnowledge Dillsboro Wideithin the pages of those books on the shelves or inside the free-to-use computers is really quite astounding.

 

These libraries are free, welcoming, and alive with curiosity and exploration – well worth a visit on a rainy day or as a date night adventure.

 

For photos of some special library touches, please visit Creatzart.com

Thank You.

 

 

 

H is for Homerun – Vintage Baseball

There is something about baseball – real baseball. Not the mega-million-dollar, made-for-TV broadcasts.

This is baseball at its finest, where the cranks (also known as fans) can breathe in the fresh grass  while experiencing that satisfying thud of a fly ball hitting a outfielder’s bare hand for the final out.

These gentlemen players are just that – gentlemen who play the game without swearing, without brawls, without dirty tricks. The visiting team will cheer on the home town guys. When any player makes an impossible catch seem effortless, both dugouts applaud – as do the spectators.

It is worth seeking out these games, and taking all generations. Grandparents might remember stories about locally famous players; younger children will see true sportsmanship in action, and everyone will have a wonderful afternoon together.

For more pictures of the

Belle River Baseball Club and the Batesville Lumbermen

playing vintage baseball,

please visit Creatzart.com

Thank You.