Category: Local Icon

X Marks the Spot Along the Ohio River

The story of the Ohio River has never been straight and clear. Like the waterway itself, the history of the river meanders and rolls, falls and loops about again. This is a river alive with the spirit of Native Americans; moving with the enterprise of frontier families, yet still learning to balance the demands of commerce with the fragility of nature.

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Be forewarned – there is a robbers’ lair tucked into the banks of the Ohio River. Named Cave-In-Rock by notorious pirate and murderer Samuel Mason, this once violent site is now a peaceful addition to the Illinois State Park system. Visitors often stay in  comfortable cabins while exploring the nearby iron furnace, or the Garden of the Gods.

Located in Clarksville, Indiana, the once impressive 26 foot drop in elevation along two and one half miles of the Ohio River is now an educational site where fossils more than 390 million years old are preserved. Due to the fluctuating water levels of the Ohio River, the Falls of the Ohio State Park is best visited in late summer and through early winter.

The public is invited to learn more about the Ohio River where it flows through Southeastern Indiana when independent filmmaker Dennis Neary presents his film, Take the River, at the Lawrenceburg Public Library on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at 6:00PM.

W is for Whitewater Canal Tunnel

Just a short stroll from South Miami Avenue in the Southwest Ohio town of Cleves is tucked an often overlooked piece of history: the Cincinnati – Whitewater Canal Tunnel.

Now a mere mere hint of what it once was and what it once promised for the region, this silt-filled tunnel had been used by canal boats for just thirteen years. Sold to the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Railroad in 1863, soon locomotives thundered through the often flooded tunnel until being abandoned in the late 1880s.

Built during the years of 1839 – 1843, the Whitewater Canal Tunnel linked Hagerstown and Connersville, Indiana to Harrison, Ohio before entering Lawrenceburg, Indiana, until reaching the mighty Ohio River.

http://www.indcanal.org/

One of twelve canal tunnels in the country at the time, today only four such tunnels remain. This nearly forgotten structure was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2014/03/24/problems-plagued-canal-projects/6833875/

http://www.northbendohio.org/CanalTunnel.html

http://www.cincinnati-transit.net/whitewater.html

 

 

 

V is for Vehicles

From the Avanti to the Pilot, Indiana has enjoyed a colorful and eclectic love affair with vehicles.

 

In the early 1900s, only Michigan produced more vehicles than Indiana. Many of Indiana’s car manufacturers were smaller companies, like Richmond’s Westcott Motor Car Company, or the McFarlan Motor Corporation in Connersville, or the J & M Motorcar Company of Lawrenceburg.

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Certain Indiana car manufacturers’ names are immediately recognized by the general public even today:  Studebaker and Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg and Willys-Overland . These are iconic names and still incredible vehicles.

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The role of the automobile in Indiana’s history is too expansive a topic to fit into one post, so look for future stories highlighting many of the lesser known car manufacturers. Many of these enterprises began as carriage works or wagon makers in the small towns and quiet communities throughout the state.

 

U is for Unexpected

On the shelves and in the nooks of Granny’s Cookie Jars and Ice Cream Parlor, are tucked nearly as many salt and pepper shakers as there are cookie jars.

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This family owned shop is as delicious to look at, as the ice cream is to eat!

How about a little turkey or duck with that?

It’s like a scavenger hunt for fun!

Enjoy yourself for an afternoon in Metamora.

J is for Judicial

Indiana’s Ohio County Courthouse is the oldest courthouse in continuous use in the state. The pretty town of Rising Sun was platted in 1816, and fewer than 30 years later, this courthouse was erected and paid for solely from donations.

This historic structure is an excellent example of the benefits of restoration and preservation. By caring for this important part of the county’s – and the state’s – history, the stories of previous generations can come alive for today’s visitors and residents.

For more photos of Indiana courthouses, please visit:

Creatzart.com

Thank You.

 

G is for Guilford Covered Bridge

Until the arrival of steel bridges, most waterways were crossed by footbridge, boat, ferry, or wooden bridge. Of these, the wooden-built, covered bridge might be the most iconic.

According to National Society for the Preservation of Covered Bridges, Parke County, Indiana takes pride in being home to 31 covered bridges – the most found in any county in the United States – but Pennsylvania can boast a whopping 213 covered bridges throughout the state.

In Southeastern Indiana, easily visible from State Road 1, rests the Guilford Covered Bridge. The adjacent roadside park named for the bridge is accessed by this 119′ long span.

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Originally built in 1879 by the Kennedy family of bridge builders, the structure had to be rebuilt in 1997 after being damaged by arsonists in 1993. Today, the Dearborn County Parks Department maintains this historic bridge and the accompanying playground and picnic area.

For more information about this and other covered bridges, please click on the highlighted text above, and to enjoy more photos of this bridge and park, please visit  Creatzart.com

 

X is for Triple XXX Family Restaurant

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On a hill in West Lafayette, Indiana is an 85+ year old tradition – the Triple XXX Family Restaurant. With burgers actually ground from fresh sirloin onsite, to real, homemade-from-scratch potato salad, every delicious, succulent bite demands a plethora of napkins and results in the the occasional, ‘mmmm’ and ‘ooohhhh’ and plenty of  ‘Oooohhh …schoo gwood …mmmmm.’

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The root beer is an integral part of the history and continued success of the place – the distinct flavor compliments everything on the menu. OK, even being a root beer fan, I might have to exclude some of the breakfast items. But it’s still one of the best bottled root beers I’ve ever tasted.