Category: Memories

U is for Unexpected

On the shelves and in the nooks of Granny’s Cookie Jars and Ice Cream Parlor, are tucked nearly as many salt and pepper shakers as there are cookie jars.

DSC_0014

This family owned shop is as delicious to look at, as the ice cream is to eat!

How about a little turkey or duck with that?

It’s like a scavenger hunt for fun!

Enjoy yourself for an afternoon in Metamora.

T is for Train Depots

 

Shrill whistles, clattering tracks, rhythmic rolling cars … imagine the train depot as it used to be.

I have wonderful memories of feeling the approaching train before hearing the whistle or seeing the blinding light.

100_7429

I have seen the mail bag tossed and caught, have seen the stationmaster extend notes to the engineer, watched as a working man’s arm reached from the window, catching the note, but never the hook.

As a child, I tried to push the heavy baggage trolleys on their iron wheels across uneven planks. I’ve ridden in steam trains and diesel trains, looked from the uppermost windows of a caboose, and I have stood probably too near the track as freight trains thundered past, feeling a surge of terror and excitement and longing to travel as fast, as far into the unknown.

100_4116

S is for Sky

On this beautiful Earth Day, look up – the sky is always a work of art!

Q is for Quilting

Handed down from one generation to the next, quilting is sometimes considered to be an aging art or a forgotten DSC_0082laborious task.

In actuality, quilting is fresh and alive and bursting into the future. Time-saving mini-quilt kits are available, and today’s projects can be made in whole, or in part, on technologically advanced machines.

DSC_0028

Modern designs, superior fabrics, and wide open opportunities for self expression have completely erased any lingering stereotypical images of hand sewing by candlelight.

 

Seek out quilt shows, like the annual Quiltfest in Rising Sun, Indiana, where these quilts were photographed earlier this month. Talk with creative and informative quilters, like members of the Sunshine Stitchers or Rivertown Quilters.

Visit your local fabric shop – not one of those mega-craft-warehouses. A real fabric shop where the employees actually make things, and can tell with one touch or a glance if that bolt of fabric is 100% cotton, or a blend.

DSC_0075

 

Discover the incredible world of color, texture and adventure!

 

DSC_0018

For more pictures of Quiltfest 2016, please visit;

Creatzart.com

Thank you.

O is for Overlooked

DSC_0356IMG_20150117_154507-1

 

It happens to all of us – this overlooking, neglecting, ignoring. Life is too busy, time is too short.

But in the rush to accomplish and do and become, all too often we forget what made living so exciting and happy and fresh …

 

 

 

The overlooked might be funny …

IMG_20160225_151657

Might be lovely …

100_4074

Might be silly …

100_4681

Might be cool …

100_5403

Might be meaningful only to one person.

But still, very important.

J is for Judicial

Indiana’s Ohio County Courthouse is the oldest courthouse in continuous use in the state. The pretty town of Rising Sun was platted in 1816, and fewer than 30 years later, this courthouse was erected and paid for solely from donations.

This historic structure is an excellent example of the benefits of restoration and preservation. By caring for this important part of the county’s – and the state’s – history, the stories of previous generations can come alive for today’s visitors and residents.

For more photos of Indiana courthouses, please visit:

Creatzart.com

Thank You.

 

G is for Guilford Covered Bridge

Until the arrival of steel bridges, most waterways were crossed by footbridge, boat, ferry, or wooden bridge. Of these, the wooden-built, covered bridge might be the most iconic.

According to National Society for the Preservation of Covered Bridges, Parke County, Indiana takes pride in being home to 31 covered bridges – the most found in any county in the United States – but Pennsylvania can boast a whopping 213 covered bridges throughout the state.

In Southeastern Indiana, easily visible from State Road 1, rests the Guilford Covered Bridge. The adjacent roadside park named for the bridge is accessed by this 119′ long span.

DSC_0074

Originally built in 1879 by the Kennedy family of bridge builders, the structure had to be rebuilt in 1997 after being damaged by arsonists in 1993. Today, the Dearborn County Parks Department maintains this historic bridge and the accompanying playground and picnic area.

For more information about this and other covered bridges, please click on the highlighted text above, and to enjoy more photos of this bridge and park, please visit  Creatzart.com