Category: Photography

Y is for Yikes!

In my search for an unusual word or two beginning with the letter Y, I discovered an incredible website:

http://phrontistery.info/y.html

In celebration of all things Y, I have opted to create a short vocabulary quiz – taking advantage of Mr. Stephen Chrisomalis‘ hard work and tremendous passion for words.

Please choose the correct definition of each word:

Yelm

  1. A 16th century crock used in cooking
  2. The deck area immediately below the helm of a ship
  3. A straight bundle of straw used for thatching

Yapness

  1. Noise
  2. Hunger
  3. Exhaustion

Yaffingale

  1. A traveling jester/commedien
  2. A green woodpecker
  3. A tool used by blacksmiths

Yex

  1. To hiccup, belch or spit
  2. To curse, defame or libel
  3. To damage, mar or deface

To determine your score, please visit The Phrontistery and find each word in the provided list, or scroll down.

 

Yelm

  1. A 16th century crock used in cooking
  2. The deck area immediately below the helm of a ship
  3. A straight bundle of straw used for thatching

Yapness

  1. Noise
  2. Hunger
  3. Exhaustion

Yaffingale

  1. A traveling jester/commedien
  2. A green woodpecker
  3. A tool used by blacksmiths

Yex

  1. To hiccup, belch or spit
  2. To curse, defame or libel
  3. To damage, mar or deface

So … how did you fare? Are you inspired to use one or more of these words as a vocabulary-bomb during casual conversation? Are you curious about Mr. Chrisomalis’ website and impatient to discover more words? Will you suggest your writers’ group visit his site when looking for unusual writing prompts?

Ahh – let the fun begin!

 

X Marks the Spot Along the Ohio River

The story of the Ohio River has never been straight and clear. Like the waterway itself, the history of the river meanders and rolls, falls and loops about again. This is a river alive with the spirit of Native Americans; moving with the enterprise of frontier families, yet still learning to balance the demands of commerce with the fragility of nature.

R Rising Sun West

Be forewarned – there is a robbers’ lair tucked into the banks of the Ohio River. Named Cave-In-Rock by notorious pirate and murderer Samuel Mason, this once violent site is now a peaceful addition to the Illinois State Park system. Visitors often stay in  comfortable cabins while exploring the nearby iron furnace, or the Garden of the Gods.

Located in Clarksville, Indiana, the once impressive 26 foot drop in elevation along two and one half miles of the Ohio River is now an educational site where fossils more than 390 million years old are preserved. Due to the fluctuating water levels of the Ohio River, the Falls of the Ohio State Park is best visited in late summer and through early winter.

The public is invited to learn more about the Ohio River where it flows through Southeastern Indiana when independent filmmaker Dennis Neary presents his film, Take the River, at the Lawrenceburg Public Library on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at 6:00PM.

W is for Whitewater Canal Tunnel

Just a short stroll from South Miami Avenue in the Southwest Ohio town of Cleves is tucked an often overlooked piece of history: the Cincinnati – Whitewater Canal Tunnel.

Now a mere mere hint of what it once was and what it once promised for the region, this silt-filled tunnel had been used by canal boats for just thirteen years. Sold to the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Railroad in 1863, soon locomotives thundered through the often flooded tunnel until being abandoned in the late 1880s.

Built during the years of 1839 – 1843, the Whitewater Canal Tunnel linked Hagerstown and Connersville, Indiana to Harrison, Ohio before entering Lawrenceburg, Indiana, until reaching the mighty Ohio River.

http://www.indcanal.org/

One of twelve canal tunnels in the country at the time, today only four such tunnels remain. This nearly forgotten structure was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2014/03/24/problems-plagued-canal-projects/6833875/

http://www.northbendohio.org/CanalTunnel.html

http://www.cincinnati-transit.net/whitewater.html

 

 

 

V is for Vehicles

From the Avanti to the Pilot, Indiana has enjoyed a colorful and eclectic love affair with vehicles.

 

In the early 1900s, only Michigan produced more vehicles than Indiana. Many of Indiana’s car manufacturers were smaller companies, like Richmond’s Westcott Motor Car Company, or the McFarlan Motor Corporation in Connersville, or the J & M Motorcar Company of Lawrenceburg.

100_4360

Certain Indiana car manufacturers’ names are immediately recognized by the general public even today:  Studebaker and Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg and Willys-Overland . These are iconic names and still incredible vehicles.

100_4282

100_4255

The role of the automobile in Indiana’s history is too expansive a topic to fit into one post, so look for future stories highlighting many of the lesser known car manufacturers. Many of these enterprises began as carriage works or wagon makers in the small towns and quiet communities throughout the state.

 

U is for Unexpected

On the shelves and in the nooks of Granny’s Cookie Jars and Ice Cream Parlor, are tucked nearly as many salt and pepper shakers as there are cookie jars.

DSC_0014

This family owned shop is as delicious to look at, as the ice cream is to eat!

How about a little turkey or duck with that?

It’s like a scavenger hunt for fun!

Enjoy yourself for an afternoon in Metamora.

T is for Train Depots

 

Shrill whistles, clattering tracks, rhythmic rolling cars … imagine the train depot as it used to be.

I have wonderful memories of feeling the approaching train before hearing the whistle or seeing the blinding light.

100_7429

I have seen the mail bag tossed and caught, have seen the stationmaster extend notes to the engineer, watched as a working man’s arm reached from the window, catching the note, but never the hook.

As a child, I tried to push the heavy baggage trolleys on their iron wheels across uneven planks. I’ve ridden in steam trains and diesel trains, looked from the uppermost windows of a caboose, and I have stood probably too near the track as freight trains thundered past, feeling a surge of terror and excitement and longing to travel as fast, as far into the unknown.

100_4116

S is for Sky

On this beautiful Earth Day, look up – the sky is always a work of art!