Category: Remember

U is for Unexpected

On the shelves and in the nooks of Granny’s Cookie Jars and Ice Cream Parlor, are tucked nearly as many salt and pepper shakers as there are cookie jars.

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This family owned shop is as delicious to look at, as the ice cream is to eat!

How about a little turkey or duck with that?

It’s like a scavenger hunt for fun!

Enjoy yourself for an afternoon in Metamora.

T is for Train Depots

 

Shrill whistles, clattering tracks, rhythmic rolling cars … imagine the train depot as it used to be.

I have wonderful memories of feeling the approaching train before hearing the whistle or seeing the blinding light.

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I have seen the mail bag tossed and caught, have seen the stationmaster extend notes to the engineer, watched as a working man’s arm reached from the window, catching the note, but never the hook.

As a child, I tried to push the heavy baggage trolleys on their iron wheels across uneven planks. I’ve ridden in steam trains and diesel trains, looked from the uppermost windows of a caboose, and I have stood probably too near the track as freight trains thundered past, feeling a surge of terror and excitement and longing to travel as fast, as far into the unknown.

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O is for Overlooked

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It happens to all of us – this overlooking, neglecting, ignoring. Life is too busy, time is too short.

But in the rush to accomplish and do and become, all too often we forget what made living so exciting and happy and fresh …

 

 

 

The overlooked might be funny …

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Might be lovely …

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Might be silly …

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Might be cool …

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Might be meaningful only to one person.

But still, very important.

K is for Keeps

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Playing for keeps. This is for keeps. Finders keepers.

From childhood, we learn that keeping is good and losing is sad. To let something go, like a balloon or a kite, is rarely the goal, so we are warned to hold onto the string or we won’t get another.

We grow up and often struggle with not-keeping – relationships that fade over time, or jobs that no longer exist.

As we mature, we face the letting go of the people we most deeply love.

Today countless people are saying goodbye to a young woman who I never met. Lauren Hill was just 19 years old and died from  Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG).

On April 10th, her family had no choice but to let her go – to release her spirit into peace after a courageous and loving and painful and exhilarating and funny and frustrating and terrific life. A life that Miss Hill wanted very much to keep.

Sometimes we simply cannot keep what we most love. Sometimes the decision is just not ours to make.

But we aren’t necessarily limited to mourning and memories. We can keep the Lauren Hills of our hearts a vibrant part of our lives by taking up their unfinished work – be it fundraising for cancer, caring for others, reading a book, or planting a garden.

The strings might slip through our fingers and the balloons drift beyond our grasp, but we can look into the sky at any moment and be inspired to reach toward the heights.

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